Call for Papers

R2R Lifecycle

Call for Proposals for the 2019 Conference

A Call for Papers for the 2019 Researcher to Reader Conference will be announced in May or June 2018.

 

Call for Proposals for the 2018 Conference

The Call for Papers for the 2018 Conference (described below) closed on 31 August 2017. The programme for 2018 is now full.

Announcement

The annual international scholarly communications conference, Researcher to Reader, will next take place in London on 26 & 27 February 2018.  The Advisory Board is inviting proposals for presentations, panels, lightning talks and workshops. We are also seeking experienced workshop facilitators.

We are particularly seeking proposals from librarians, researchers, editors & funders, from people based outside the UK, and from under-represented demographics.

Proposers are invited to provide an abstract (50-100 words) and a fuller description (200-500 words) by 31 August 2017.

To make a proposal for participation in the Researcher to Reader 2018, please first explore this website for more information about the Conference.  Then access the submission portal to provide your proposal information: Researcher to Reader Conference 2018 Submission Portal

R2R 2018 Call for Papers 01 Mid PNG

More information is given in the Call for Participation and Guidance for Proposers sections below.

Call for Participation

Introduction

The Researcher to Reader Conference is a key forum for discussion of the international scholarly content supply chain – exploring how academic knowledge is conveyed from the Researcher to the Reader.

The Conference takes place annually in London each February and is attended by around 150-200 senior delegates from all parts of the scholarly communications lifecycle, including funders, researchers, research managers, publishers, distributors, technologists and librarians.

The Conference Advisory Board is inviting proposals for participation in the next Conference, on 26 & 27 February 2018. Responses should be submitted by 31 August 2017.

Proposals could include suggestions for presentations, panels, lightning talks or  workshops. We are also seeking nominations for speakers, panellists, workshop experts and workshop facilitators.

Participants who are selected will generally receive a complimentary delegate place at the full Conference. Any other costs for attendance will be the responsibility of the participant, although we are occasionally able to offer some support toward travel or accommodation.

A description of the Conference themes and formats is given below, with further  information on these themes, the formats and the submission rules being given in the next section, Guidance for Proposers.

Conference Themes

The 2018 Conference will have two main themes:

  • Research and Publishing Integrity
  • Beyond Open Access – Designing a New Lifecycle

The Conference programme is not restricted to these two themes, however, and we are also inviting proposals on any other suitable topic.

Research and Publishing Integrity

Today there is an increased awareness of questionable research methods and ethics, growing concerns about the moral hazard of the author-pays model, new and perverse incentives that drive down research quality and encourage scholarly self-promotion, and an environment of journalistic hype and ‘fake news’. How can the scholarly communications processes and participants work most effectively to reduce the risk of bad research or inaccurate communications?

We welcome proposals that seek to address these questions, especially those that consider the matter from the perspective of more than one aspect of the scholarly communications lifecycle.

Beyond Open Access – Designing a New Lifecycle

The traditional scholarly communications lifecycle, with academics submitting papers to journals for peer review & publication, and with libraries subscribing to journals and making them available to readers, has been profoundly disturbed by the open access movement, by new initiatives in peer review, by the growth in the volume of publishing, and by other changes.

We welcome proposals that: seek to examine the disruption resulting from the incremental and evolving changes that have taken place in scholarly communication over the past 15-20 years; and/or seek to propose more design-led and collaborative approaches to purposefully creating an effective and sustainable scholarly communications lifecycle for the future.

Other Topics

We also are open to proposals on any subject that would be of relevance and interest to practitioners across the whole lifecycle of scholarly publishing.  Some subjects that could be particularly interesting include:

  • Defining and Identifying Different Author Roles in Published Articles
  • Non-traditional Research Outputs and Supplemental Materials
  • Copyright: Validity, Value and Erosion in an Open World
  • The Big Deal and Open Access Offsetting
  • Marketing and Selling Scholarly Content (Paid or Free)
  • Choosing, Acquiring & Disseminating Scholarly Content (Paid or Free)
  • Books and E-Books
  • Data, Analytics, Modelling & Metrics

Participation Formats

We welcome proposals for workshops, presentations, panels and lighting talks, and we are particularly interested in proposals for workshop topics, and in finding people with the skills to facilitate workshops.

Workshops

Workshop 1.32 (ED).jpg

The workshops are very interactive, with high levels of delegate participation and engagement. Workshops discuss and attempt to reach resolution on a clearly-defined question or problem. The most effective workshops are created through a partnership between a subject expert and a facilitator, and in 2018 we will have particular focus on the quality of workshop facilitation.

Proposers are invited to offer a complete package of topic, expert & facilitator, or to simply suggest a topic, or a suitable workshop expert, or a facilitator.

Presentations

Mark Allin

Speaker presentations are normally given in plenary sessions comprising 2-3 speakers, with each presentation lasting approximately 20-30 minutes.

Presentations should be relevant to the themes of the Conference, and can be given  by any member of the research, publishing and library community. Presenters who are employed by commercial organisations are encouraged to participate, but their presentations must be of general interest to the community and faithful to the event’s objectives, not merely corporate messages.

Panels

Int & Subs - Q&APanel discussions are a chance for both experts and general delegates to discuss a key topic of interest to the community. Panels work best where an issue needs discussion amongst knowledgeable pundits, and where the chair is well-prepared and an excellent facilitator.  Proposers are invited to offer a complete package of topic, chair & panellists, or to simply suggest a topic, or a suitable chair, or panellists.

Lightning Talks

A lightning talk is a very brief presentation lasting up to four minutes. This does not give time for a complete presentation, but is an opportunity to raise a topic of interest and point the delegates toward further information.   A presenter of a lightning talk will not automatically receive a complimentary delegate place at the full Conference.

Proposals

To make a proposal for participation in the Researcher to Reader 2018, please first explore this website for more information about the Conference.  Then access the submission portal to provide your proposal information: Researcher to Reader Conference 2018 Submission Portal

We are particularly seeking proposals from librarians, researchers, editors & funders, from people based outside the UK, and from under-represented demographics.

 

Please complete your submission by 31 August 2017.

Guidance for Proposers

Introduction

The annual international scholarly communications conference, Researcher to Reader, will next take place in London on 26 & 27 February 2018.  The Conference will span the complete workflow of creating, validating, publishing, supplying, distributing, finding, consuming, analysing and storing research information. This gives a wide scope for the exploration of subjects such as funding, research practices, peer review, publishing processes & workflows, commercial models, discovery, delivery, usage and metrics.  A strength of the Conference is the inter-disciplinary and cross-sectoral conversations that we have.

The Advisory Board is inviting proposals for workshops, presentations, panels and lightning talks.

Proposers are invited to provide an abstract (50-100 words) and a fuller description (200-500 words) by 31 August 2017.

Below we give additional guidance on the proposed themes and topics for the 2018 Conference and on the success factors for effective workshops, presentations, panels and lightning talks.

Conference Themes for 2018

The 2018 Conference will have two main themes:

  • Research and Publishing Integrity
  • Beyond Open Access – Designing a New Lifecycle

The Conference programme is not restricted to these two themes, however, and we are also inviting proposals on any other suitable topic.

Research and Publishing Integrity

Today there is an increased awareness of questionable research methods and ethics, growing concerns about the moral hazard of the author-pays model, new and perverse incentives that drive down research quality and encourage scholarly self-promotion, and an environment of journalistic hype and ‘fake news’. How can the scholarly communications processes and participants work most effectively to reduce the risk of bad research or inaccurate communications?

We welcome proposals that seek to address these questions, especially those that consider the matter from the perspective of more than one aspect of the scholarly communications lifecycle. Subjects that might be addressed include:

  • Perverse incentives for researchers, funders, publishers and librarians, and conflict between early-career idealism and traditional incentives.
  • Problem methods in research (including systematic errors, non-publication of negative results, ‘mesearch’ (auto-ethnography), data dredging, data and statistical manipulation (eg p-hacking) and results-influenced hypothesizing (HARKing).
  • Data security (dataset hacking) and data persistence (eg preservation of US government climate data).
  • Peer review (biased, anonymous, attributed, open, post-publication, blind).
  • Predatory (dishonest) journals, bad (incompetent) journals, new (unproven) journals.
  • Library mediation of bad science and fake news.
  • Author and article over-hyping, and sensationalist science journalism.
  • The relationship between knowledge and public policy.

Beyond Open Access – Designing a New Lifecycle

The traditional scholarly communications lifecycle, with academics submitting papers to journals for peer review & publication, and with libraries subscribing to journals and making them available to readers, has been profoundly disturbed by the Open Access movement, by new initiatives in peer review, by the growth in the volume of publishing, and by other changes.

It has been suggested that the academic community has allowed a survival-based ‘evolutionary’ process to randomly populate the landscape with numerous ungainly giraffes, sloths and dodos, rather than cooperatively gathering together to apply an ‘intelligent design’ approach to define, and then implement, a new workable model.

The R2R Conference welcomes proposals that seek to pragmatically examine the disruption resulting from the incremental and evolving changes that have taken place in scholarly communication over the past 15-20 years, and that propose more purposeful design-led approaches to creating an effective and sustainable scholarly communications lifecycle for the future.

Questions that might be addressed include:

  • How did open access change from being merely a response to librarian concerns about journal costs, toward new political and operational ideals of public access and open communication, and has this metamorphosis been problematic?
  • Are Hybrid, Green, Gold and Platinum actually evolutionary dead ends, or steps on the way to a desirable and sustainable outcome?
  • What do researchers really want from the scholarly communications process? Does their needs (or their indifference) override all other agendas, or are they just another stakeholder?
  • Who were supposed to be, are currently, and should become the beneficiaries of scholarly communication, and who have been the particular beneficiaries of open access?
  • Are there potentially separate paths for scholarly communication and for career development, with one route for rapid and open information sharing, and a different process for crediting and evaluating authors?
  • What sort of organisations should own, control and operate the scholarly communications infrastructure? Which things are best done by public institutions or not-for-profit entities, and which by investor-owned companies?
  • Which parts of the lifecycle are the most important; and is controlling the user engagement and experience now more important than controlling the content?
  • Who should manage the scholarly communications processes within each institution? Is it the academic department, the office of research management / the university administration, the library, the funding organisation, or some other group?
  • How do researchers really communicate with each other? What forums, formats, content, materials, tools and technologies might actually be as important as articles and books, and should communications professionals be giving these more attention?
  • Are publishers no longer content processing companies, but author services companies? What does this mean for the scholarly communications lifecycle, and how can publisher quality be measured in this new model?

Other Themes & Open Invitation

We also are open to proposals on any subject that would be relevant and interesting for practitioners across the whole lifecycle of scholarly research and communication.  However, some subjects that our programme committee feels would be particularly interesting include the following:

Defining and Identifying Different Author Roles in Published Articles

Journal articles in many disciplines can have numerous authors listed (the article announcing the discovery of the Higgs Boson credited 2,899 authors), and these authors will have each made different contributions to the research and authoring process. How should the differing roles of these multiple authors be identified in a structured way, and who should get credit for what? What are the emerging data models and standards?

Non-traditional Research Outputs and Supplemental Materials

With a rise in the importance of both data & methods, and with new ways of communicating content (including structured datasets & video), are what might be described by publishers as ‘supplemental materials’ really just peripheral, or are they actually the main publishable product of research activity, and is the journal article just a by-product? What does this mean for scholarly communication, and for recognition & career development?

Copyright: Validity, Value and Erosion in an Open World

Following a very successful panel on copyright at the 2017 Conference, we would like to follow up on this topic, perhaps with a workshop. Topics could include:

  • the importance (or otherwise) of copyright in open scholarly communication;
  • protection of valuable content from piracy using copyright enforcement;
  • governmental moves to restrict copyright protection for publishers.

The Big Deal and Open Access Offsetting

What is the current state of the Big Deal? What happens when libraries embrace or abandon this option? When publishers offer APC offsetting against journal subscription costs (for example, with the Springer Compact) is that just ‘the big deal for OA’, and what is the institutional experience of this?

Marketing and Selling Scholarly Content (Paid or Free)

How is content sales doing, especially in an OA or hybrid world? Even if all content is free, it still needs to be visible and popular – how do OA publishers ‘sell’ free content?

Choosing, Acquiring & Disseminating Scholarly Content (Paid or Free)

The academic library still seeks to be a financial and discovery mediator between the content provider and the content consumer; how is this going, and does it have a future?

Books and E-Books

Monographs are a key element of scholarly communications, especially in Humanities and Social Sciences. We would be interested in proposals in this area, perhaps addressing the current state of the books market, e-book models & technologies, open access books and university presses.

Data, Analytics, Modelling & Metrics

Topics in this area might include: AI / machine learning, topic modelling, text mining & language processing, and the usage of data, metrics & analytics by different organisations in the scholarly communications lifecycle.

Participation Formats

The R2R Conference Programme is typically composed of workshops, presentations and panels. We are also considering including lighting talks in the 2018 programme. We welcome proposals for each of these formats, and we are particularly interested in proposals for workshop topics and in finding people with the skills to facilitate workshops.

Workshops

The workshops have been central to the Conference experience for several years, being both a productive activity and a great opportunity to meet new people. The workshops are very interactive, with high levels of delegate participation and engagement. They aim to create results that can be presented back to the whole Conference, and be of lasting value to the scholarly communication community.

Delegates choose to attend just one out of about five possible workshops, and each workshop group will (re)convene for a total duration of about 2½ hours, split across three sequential sessions during the two days of Conference.

A workshop topic may build on the content of a Conference presentation, or cover other issues of relevance to the creation, supply and consumption of academic research. A workshop could be used to gather scoping or qualitative responses as part of an academic research project, or a standards consultation.

Workshops tend to work well when they attempt to discuss and reach resolution on a clearly-defined question or problem. The workshops are not breakout presentations, but highly interactive discussions. The most effective workshops are created through a partnership between a subject expert and a facilitator, and in 2018 we will have particular focus on the quality of workshop facilitation.

Typically the subject expert will frame the question to be worked on, and provide expert knowledge during the workshop. The facilitator will summarise the topic, lead discussions, encourage broad participation and ensure that the outcomes are documented and presented back to the Conference as a whole (by the facilitator or another participant).

Proposers are invited to offer a complete package of topic, expert & facilitator, or to simply suggest a topic, or a suitable workshop expert, or a facilitator.

Presentations

Speaker presentations are normally given in plenary sessions comprising 2-3 speakers, with each presentation lasting approximately 20-30 minutes.  Each session is normally concluded with a brief but lively Q&A.

Presentations should be relevant to the themes of the Conference, and can be given  by any member of the research, publishing and library community. Presenters who are employed by intermediaries, publishers or other commercial organisations are encouraged to participate, but their presentations must be of general interest to the community and faithful to the event’s objectives, not corporate messages.

We find that the presentations most appreciated by our delegates are not: product pitches (commercial or otherwise), co-presented by more than one speaker, delivered in an ‘evangelical’ tone, read from a script, or based around slides that appear to be merely the speaker’s notes in bullet-point form.

Panels

Panel discussions are a chance for both experts and general delegates to discuss a key topic of interest to the community. Panels work best where an issue needs discussion amongst knowledgeable pundits, and where the chair is well-prepared and an excellent facilitator.  We typically allow about 1½ hours for a panel, including some scene-setting by the chair and/or panel members, the panel discussion itself, and contributions from the delegates.

Proposers are invited to offer a complete package of topic, chair & panellists, or to simply suggest a topic, or a suitable chair, or panellists.

Lightning Talks

A lightning talk is a very brief presentation lasting, at R2R, up to four minutes. This does not give time for a complete presentation, but is an opportunity to raise a topic of interest and point the delegates toward further information.  We would be willing to consider as a lightning talk a ‘pitch’ for something like a new standard, collaboration or service.

Proposals

To make a proposal for participation in the Researcher to Reader 2018, please first explore this website for more information about the Conference.  Then access the submission portal to provide your proposal information:  Researcher to Reader Conference 2018 Submission Portal

We are particularly seeking participation by librarians, researchers, editors & funders, by people based outside the UK and by under-represented demographics.

You will be asked to provide:

  • The name & contact information of the proposed participant (and of the person putting them forward, if different).
  • A brief biography of the proposed participant (50-100 words), plus an indication of relevant experience with links to any sample video-recordings.
  • The type of proposal: Workshop, Presentation, Panel, Lightning Talk, Workshop Facilitation or Other.
  • The title of the proposed contribution, plus an abstract (50-100 words) and a fuller description (200-500 words).

Please complete your submission by 31 August 2017.

If you have any questions or other communications, please contact the Conference Director, Mark Carden, at info@R2RConf.com

Additional Information

Participants who are selected will generally receive a complimentary delegate place at the full Conference, although a presenter of a lightning talk will not automatically qualify for this. Any other costs for attendance will be the responsibility of the participant, although we are occasionally able to offer some support toward travel or accommodation.

The Advisory Board has complete discretion regarding which proposals are accepted for the Conference programme and the Board’s decision is final. The Conference accepts no responsibility for any costs incurred in the preparation of proposals, or for any consequences of acceptance or rejection.

Proposers may be invited to modify their proposals to meet the needs of the Conference programme. Proposers may withdraw their proposals up to the point of acceptance, or when invited to make modifications.

Proposers agree that, if accepted, their proposal may form part of the Conference programme and that any presentation and biographical content may be included in Conference materials, including potential distribution of slides, scripts, transcripts or abstracts, and any video, audio or photographic recording.

 

 

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